What a Savior we have in Christ

Simeon Peter, a servant and an apostle of Jesus Christ: To those who have received a faith equal to ours through the righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ. May grace and peace be multiplied to you through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord. 2 Peter 1:1-2 CSB


From the text, Peter calls himself “a servant and an apostle of Jesus Christ.” The word servant also occurs in the greetings of the epistles of James (1:1) and Jude (1). Peter uses this combination to indicate that as a servant he stands next to any other servant of Jesus Christ. He is ready to accept, obey, and fulfill the orders of His Lord. Peter applies the term servant to all believers (see 1 Peter 2:16). Peter adds that he is “an apostle of Jesus Christ.” Although he served as leader of the twelve apostles and head of the Jerusalem church, he places himself not above but next to the other apostles. Peter writes that he is an apostle and not "the apostle of Jesus Christ." Therefore, Peter writes his second epistle on behalf of Christ, who discusses His authority and supremacy upon this letter. Peter writes his epistle in the capacity of an apostle of Jesus Christ, and he expects its recipients to acknowledge it as an apostolic document (see Luke 10:16). Then, Peter writes “to those who have received a faith equal to ours through the righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ.” Peter is not interested in locations but in spiritual possessions which the readers have in common with the apostle. It is the faith in Christ which both the readers and Peter have in common. God imparts righteousness to the believers who placed their faith in Him. Therefore, just like Peter, they too are fellow “servant.” In other words, the apostles are on the same spiritual level as all the other Christians. Because Jesus is God and Lord, He forgives us of our sin, sets us free from sin, to make us righteous, thus, restoring us completely. Then, Peter prayed for his fellow believers and servants of Christ: “May grace and peace be multiplied to you through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.” Peter’s prayer is that God will send us an increasing quantity of both grace and peace. “Grace” implies the qualities of mercy, love, and pardon that God extends to man. Peace flows forth from grace and is man’s internal happiness which he desires to share with his fellow man. Peter adds the phrase “through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.” In a sense, this is the theme of Peter’s letter, because the concept knowledge occurs repeatedly. Here Peter conveys the thought that knowledge is not merely an ability to recite facts but an experience that is lived out that promotes fellowship in the body of Christ and what sustains believers in times of difficulties. Therefore, in response we joyfully and thankfully sing,

“Hallelujah! what a Savior!

Hallelujah! what a Friend!

Saving, helping, keeping, loving,

He is with me to the end.” —J. Wilbur Chapman


Blessings,


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